November 19, 2020

RECORDED WEBINAR – The PPP Loan Forgiveness Gates Have Opened: Are You Equipped to Apply?

Download our recorded webinar to hear from the Anders CARES Act Research and Response Team on new details of PPP loan forgiveness you need to know before applying.

The recorded webinar covers the recent Small Business Administration (SBA) guidance on PPP loan forgiveness and insights on:

  • How to work with your bank now that the application portals are open
  • SBA Necessity Questionnaires Forms 3509 and 3510 
  • Strategies for achieving maximum loan forgiveness

Download the webinar below.

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November 17, 2020

Helped Local Private High School Obtain Forgiveness for $1.5 Million PPP Loan

A St. Louis private high school was looking for help navigating the changing regulations of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan they had received to retain over 100 employees. By partnering with Anders, the organization received guidance and assistance from their advisor and our COVID-19 Resource Center that helped them navigate the nuances and requirements. Anders worked with them to track expenses and submit their $1.5 million PPP loan for full forgiveness.

Learn more about Anders COVID-19 Business Recovery services.

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November 10, 2020

PPP with Paul and Dan Video Series

With new updates and legislation evolving quickly around the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), our CARES Act Research and Response Team has been focused on relaying information you need to know. Two of the team members, Paul C. Rhea and Daniel K. Schindler, are sharing the latest changes around PPP loans and the forgiveness process in their video series: PPP with Paul and Dan.

View each segment of the series below. Check out more CARES Act content in our COVID-19 Resource Center, or learn how we can help your business recover from COVID-19.

November 10, 2020

October 13, 2020

October 7, 2020

September 18, 2020

September 4, 2020

August 28, 2020

August 21, 2020

August 13, 2020

July 24, 2020

July 16, 2020

June 25, 2020
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November 5, 2020

Secured $150,000 in Missouri Small Business Grants for St. Louis Restaurants

With local pandemic restrictions taking a toll on St. Louis restaurants, our CARES Act team helped restaurant clients evaluate and secure much-needed funding. Missouri Small Business Grants were one of the funding options available for eligible food service businesses. Our CARES Act team helped three local restaurants apply and obtain $50,000 each in Missouri Small Business Grants that helped keep their staff employed and doors open.

Learn more about Anders COVID-19 Business Recovery services.

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October 9, 2020

New Streamlined Forgiveness Application for Smaller PPP Loans

Businesses with Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans of $50,000 or less can now utilize a simpler forgiveness application. The new application, released by the SBA and U.S. Treasury, is meant to streamline the PPP loan forgiveness process for borrowers and lenders.

Details of the New Application

The new application comes out of a new interim final rule (IFR) providing guidance on forgiveness and loan review processes for PPP loans of $50,000 or less. Borrowers with affiliates that received loans totaling $2 million or more are not eligible to use the new application. Under the IFR, eligible loan borrowers are exempted from any reductions in forgiveness based on:

  • Reductions in full-time equivalent (FTE) employees
  • Reductions in employee salary or wages, and

According to the IFR, of the 5.2 million PPP loans approved by the SBA, about 3.57 million, or $62 billion of the $525 billion, were for $50,000 or less.

Good News for Businesses with Smaller PPP Loans

For borrowers with PPP loans less than $50,000, this is good news as they are not required to perform complicated FTE or salary reduction calculations. Borrowers of $50,000 or less still will have to make some certifications and provide documentation to the lender for payroll and nonpayroll costs.

Before deciding to move forward with the new application, make sure to check with your bank on if and when they are starting to accept applications. View the instructions for completing Form 3508S or the Form 3508S application.

Legislation is continuing to evolve and it’s important to keep up with the latest rules and regulations to make sure you’re making decisions based on accurate data. Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more resources. To discuss your situation and recovery options, contact an Anders advisor below.

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October 8, 2020

Business Interruption Grant Program Offers Pandemic Relief for Illinois Businesses

The Business Interruption Grant (BIG) is a historic recovery program for Illinois small businesses hit hardest by the ongoing pandemic. The first round of funding released $49 million in August to 2,655 small businesses across the state. Grants averaged $17,000 and were used to cover expenses such as payroll, rent, and other operational costs for small businesses in economically distressed areas.

Round Two

The second round of BIG will provide more than $200 million to heavily impacted industries and disproportionately impacted areas. The Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) has pledged that at least half of all remaining funds, totaling more than $100 million, will be reserved for businesses in downstate and rural communities of Illinois.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Must be an independently owned and operated for-profit corporation or limited liability corporation, partnership, or sole proprietorship authorized to conduct business in the State of Illinois; OR a 501c3, 501c6, or 501c19 nonprofit;
  • Must have been operating for at least three months prior to March 2020;
  • Must have had less than $20 million in revenue in calendar year 2019, or a pro-rated amount if in operation for less than a year prior to March 2020;
  • Must have experienced operating losses since March 21, 2020;
  • Must have been closed or had reduced operations due to government orders, public health guidelines, or depressed consumer demand during the COVID 19 pandemic;
  • Must have complied with all relevant laws, regulations, and executive orders from the State and federal government, including the social distancing guidelines as promulgated by the Executive Orders of the Illinois Governor

Deadline

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until all funds are exhausted. Access the BIG application here.

This is a brief summary of the Business Interruption Grant (BIG). Contact an Anders advisor below for more details on applying, eligibility and other information.  Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential business impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more news, tools and insights you need to know in these uncertain times.

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October 7, 2020

Selling Your Business? SBA Clarifies Change of Ownership Rules for PPP Loan Borrowers

Many businesses have received and benefitted from Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan funding during the pandemic, but the rules on loan forgiveness have continued to evolve. On October 2, the SBA published a Procedural Notice regarding “change of ownership” in the event that a PPP loan is still outstanding at the time of the sale of a business. It was obvious from the loan documentation that was originally signed, that the sale of a business would be problematic while the loan was still outstanding. Borrowers and advisors have been anxiously awaiting clarification. Highlighted below are the primary areas that were defined.

How does the SBA define “change of ownership”?

The SBA defines a change of ownership in a business when one of the following occurs:

  1. At least 20% of the common stock or other ownership interest of a PPP borrower, including a publicly traded entity, is sold or otherwise transferred, whether in one or more transactions, including to an affiliate or an existing owner of the entity                                                                     
  2. The PPP borrower sells or otherwise transfers at least 50% of its assets, measured by fair market value, whether in one or more transactions
  3. The PPP borrower is merged with or into another entity

When is SBA approval required?

SBA approval is required on all sale transactions, with the exception of any of the following situations where only lender approval is necessary:

  1. The PPP loan is fully satisfied, which means the loan is either:
  2. Paid in full; or 
  3. Forgiven by the SBA (i.e., the SBA has remitted payment to the lender) and any unforgiven amounts are paid in full.
  • In a stock sale or merger:
  • A sale or transfer of less than 50% of the borrower’s common stock or other ownership; or
  • The PPP borrower completes a loan forgiveness application reflecting its use of all loan proceeds and submits it to the lender and puts in an interest-bearing escrow account controlled by the PPP lender funds equal to the outstanding balance of the PPP loan.
  • In an asset sale of 50% or more of the borrower’s assets, if the PPP borrower completes a loan forgiveness application reflecting its use of all loan proceeds and submits it to the lender and puts in an interest-bearing escrow account controlled by the PPP lender funds equal to the outstanding balance of the PPP loan.

What is the borrower required to do prior to the sale?

Prior to the closing of any change of ownership transaction, the PPP borrower must notify the lender in writing of the transaction and provide the lender with a copy of the relevant transaction documents necessary to effectuate the proposed transaction. The lender is required to submit certain documentation regarding the transaction to the SBA within five business days of the completion of the transaction.

Despite the occurrence of a change of ownership, the PPP borrower remains responsible for:

  1. Continued performance of all obligations under the PPP loan;
  2. Certifications made under the PPP loan application, including the certification of economic necessity; and
  3. Continued compliance with all other PPP loan requirements.

The PPP borrower continues to be responsible for obtaining, preparing, and retaining all required forms and documentation and providing these forms and documents to the PPP lender, servicer, or SBA upon request.

The new owners are liable for any unauthorized uses of PPP loan proceeds by the new owner.  If the new owner also had a PPP loan, the PPP loan funds must be segregated and properly allocated among the two borrowers.

Where do we go from here?

Although many questions were answered in this most recent guidance, there is much still that remains unanswered, including:

  • How can I speed up the process if pending M&A activity is imminent?
  • What happens if the bank allowed a sale to already happen prior to the new guidance?
  • What recourse do I have if my bank isn’t accepting applications yet?
  • Who is responsible if SBA reviews a loan years later and nullifies some or all of the forgiveness?

Read the full SBA Procedural Notice.

Open and upfront communication with your bank and/or advisors is critical prior to any transaction. Legislation is continuing to evolve and it’s important to keep up with the latest rules and regulations to make sure you’re making decisions based on accurate data. Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more resources. To discuss your situation and recovery options, contact an Anders advisor below.

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September 29, 2020

Net Operating Loss Carrybacks Offer a New Cash Flow Opportunity Under the CARES Act

The CARES Act has created many tax planning opportunities for individuals and businesses alike. One of these opportunities is the ability to carry back a net operating loss (NOL) that occurred in a taxable year beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2021.

What is a net operating loss?

A net operating loss (NOL) occurs when a company has more allowable tax deductions than it has taxable income. NOLs reduce either past or future taxable income from loss carrybacks or carryforwards. In recent years, tax reform bills have altered the treatment of NOLs though the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, and the more recently passed CARES Act.

What are the carryback benefits?

NOLs can now be carried back up to five years to fully offset a prior year’s taxable income resulting in a refund of income tax paid in that year. If choosing to take advantage of this opportunity, the losses must first be carried back to the earliest available year of income.

Since the loss can be carried back to years before the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, refunds can be generated at a more favorable tax rate of up to 35%, rather than the more current 21% rate. These refunds have the potential to provide cash flow relief for many manufacturers.

How can I claim a refund for NOLs?

Depending on the year the loss incurred and date the return was filed will determine the best method to file a claim for refund. Businesses will be allowed to file Form 1139, Corporation Application for Tentative Refund, or file an amended corporate tax return. Individuals, trusts and estates can file Form 1045. If you have the option, Form 1139 will be processed faster, resulting in a quicker refund compared to filing an amended return.  Please refer to Notice 2020-26 for further filing information.

Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more resources. To discuss your situation and recovery options, contact an Anders advisor below.

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September 10, 2020

5 Ways Manufacturers Can Increase Cash Flow to Offset COVID-19

With months of state and local business capacity limits and social distance measures implemented during COVID-19, many stores have been forced to close and consumer spending has decreased. In turn, many companies, including manufacturers, have become even more focused on cash flow planning. Now with factories and businesses beginning to open back up, management has the responsibility to review essential strategies and focus on enhanced cash flow planning in order to protect the health and welfare of their basic business operations.

Steps for Improving Cash Flow

Manufacturers can look at optimizing various strategic aspects of their businesses and working capital in order to improve and enhance cash flows. Below are five ideas on how to harness some of these strategies in order to help with cash flow management.

1) Leverage Financing

Many manufacturers have a lot of availability under lines of credit. By identifying strong levels of inventory or receivables, these can be used as collateral to draw on current credit lines, which will ensure immediate cash needs are met. Financing options may dwindle over time as customers choose to extend payments and as receivables age, decreasing the value that inventory and these receivables would provide as collateral, so acting on this sooner rather than later is beneficial to most businesses.

2) Cut Costs

There are many avenues that a manufacturing company can take in order to reduce and manage costs. A couple of examples include postponing a 401(k) match, cutting temporary staff and leasing equipment rather than purchasing it. Another avenue is to streamline processes which can indirectly help reduce costs. By focusing on how to effectively improve a manufacturing process and reduce the time, energy and costs associated with it, this sets up a company to become overall more efficient and stronger which can combat any future slow periods and help the company surge ahead during peak periods.

3) Manage Inventory

Many manufacturers strive to maintain inventory levels that are high enough to ensure a quick and timely reaction to incoming orders. Reviewing inventory needs can lead to companies maintaining more appropriate levels of inventory on hand by lowering safety stock levels to conserve cash without reducing their abilities to fulfill orders.

4) Delay the Accounts Payable Process

Manufacturers can stretch out payments by coordinating and staggering the timing of when to pay vendors and suppliers by reviewing their payment options in order to take advantage of any discounts for earlier payment versus delaying payment in full for vendors who have a longer payment period.

5) Review Accounts Receivable Process

Manufacturers should evaluate their collection strategies by reviewing invoice presentation as many companies struggle to send invoices to customers in a timely manner or the invoices have incorrect information reported that delays a customer’s payments. Also, a company can consider the timeliness of when an invoice a generated, when it is sent to the customer, if there are electronic options to send the invoice to the customer and to have the customer pay, such as ACH, credit cards or other electronic means which can all speed up cash collections. As mentioned in #4, customers may also be utilizing a strategy of delaying payments to vendors. Manufacturers should address and improve their collection policies or offer discounts or incentives to customers for faster payment.

To discover personalized cash flow strategies for your business, contact an Anders advisor below. Learn more about our COVID-19 Business Recovery services or how we work with manufacturers and distributors.

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September 1, 2020

How a CARES Act Correction to Qualified Improvement Property Can Increase Cash Flow for Bars and Restaurants

After the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017 brought some unintended consequences to the tax treatment of qualified improvement property, a long-awaited change has come that could provide an immediate cash flow opportunity for restaurants, bars and the hospitality industry as a whole. Businesses that have made any qualified improvements such as ceilings, installation of drywall, interior doors, electrical or plumbing during the last two years can benefit from a technical correction made by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

While the pandemic has had a particularly difficult effect on those in the restaurant and hospitality industry, this new tax savings opportunity could go a long way in helping those within the industry recoup some of the income lost during this time.

Bonus Depreciation Eligibility

Before COVID-19, many restaurants, breweries and bars made improvements to their nonresidential buildings during the last couple of years, such as updating a lobby, kitchen, or distillery. Whether these improvements were remodels, new signage or drive thru windows, these large expenditures were most likely then met with a much higher tax liability than anticipated for 2018 and 2019. The CARES Act provided a technical correction that most have been waiting for since the end of 2017. The CARES Act treats Qualified Improvement Property (QIP) as 15-year property, resulting in taxpayers being eligible to take 100% bonus depreciation on QIP rather than the previously stated depreciation over 39 years. This change is retroactive to January 2018.

Taking Advantage of the New QIP Rules and Retroactive Benefits

It’s important for restaurants and all businesses who have yet to file their 2019 return to re-evaluate all potential QIP for this tax saving opportunity.

Taxpayers who have filed their 2018 and/or 2019 tax returns, and had placed  QIP in service, may consider amending their 2018/2019 return to treat any QIP as 15-year property and eligible for bonus depreciation. Another option to filing an amended return, taxpayers may consider filing Form 3115, Application for Change in Accounting Method, with their 2019 tax return (if not yet filed) or their 2020 tax return and claim the previously missed depreciation as a 481(a) adjustment. This change in accounting method will allow taxpayers to “catch up” all missed QIP depreciation from the beginning of 2018 to current.

Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more resources. To discuss your situation and recovery options, contact an Anders advisor below.

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