July 14, 2020

Why Companies Need to Reevaluate Internal Controls in the New Normal Work Environment

As stay-at-home orders and social distancing have shifted the workforce in many ways, companies are left with many changes to their accounting and financial reporting environments. Many of these changes were expected, but some changes may have unintended consequences. Pre-pandemic policies were designed to set up effective and efficient controls. However, the controls that were designed may not be effective, or even applicable in the current environment. These changes present the perfect opportunity for management to reevaluate their control environment, begin assessing and updating the risks that lie within that environment, and redesign their policies and procedures.

How to Assess Your Internal Controls

The first and most important step in the process will be assessing where risk lies within the accounting and financial reporting systems. Management should consider where and how fraud or misstatements could occur. Once management knows where the potential risks are, management can insert the needed controls to deter and reduce those risks.

Segregation of Duties

One of the strongest ways to reduce risk is to achieve segregation of duties. This separates the physical custody of assets, record-keeping of the transactions, and authorization of transactions. Under the new normal, segregation of duties may have some barriers that need to be overcome. There are many resources that are available to help achieve better segregation of duties. One example would be using a lock-box to accept deposits. Once the receipt is entered into the lock-box, the accounting department can record the deposit, without having physical custody of any cash or checks. On the cash disbursement side, there are tools such as Bill.com or positive pay to ensure the vendors you want to pay are actually paid.

Strengthen Review Process

Another key control in the internal control environment is review. This can range from the review of KPIs, review of check support, review of bank reconciliations, or financial statement review. However, the review process is only as good as the reviewer. Too often, someone is going through the motions of the review, mainly as they are not exactly sure what they should be looking for. It is key that the reviewer has proper expertise or training. For example, while reviewing the bank reconciliation, they should review the list of payments, outstanding checks and other reconciling items and any other transactions that hit the cash account and reconciliation. The person tasked with the review should be familiar with the company’s vendors so they would recognize any irregular payments.

Electronic Approval

For many companies, some degree of remote work may be permanent. The amount of physical paperwork that circulates through the office may be significantly reduced, thus the approval process will look differently. Where old procedures would require formal written sign offs, such as initials on the bank reconciliation or signature on the support for cash disbursements, there may not be hard copies of these items to sign with a formal sign off. This is where electronic approval may replace old, hard copy approvals. It is important to note in the electronic approval what was reviewed and what is approved. This can take the form of an email approval to the appropriate personnel, or utilization within various softwares, such as DocuSign.

The workforce will continue to evolve over the next year, and each evolution should bring new considerations to the control environment. As mentioned above, the first important step is to assess the risk environment. This will be a continual process that management can implement into their daily processes. As each day brings about new changes, it is important to document and apply changes to the environment as they occur.

Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential business impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more insights or contact Anders below to discuss how we can help you adjust your internal controls.

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July 7, 2020

How to Turn A Great Idea into a Startup Business

As an entrepreneur, when you have a great idea, it can be exciting to get a new business started right away. But to make sure the startup is set up for success, there are necessary steps entrepreneurs need to take. Proper planning up front by creating a business plan, building a great team and developing a financing strategy will help turn a great idea into a profitable business.

Create a Business Plan

The first step is to create your own business plan. The business plan could originally be for yourself to help you build out your strategy on paper. The business plan could also be for external investors or other business partners down the road. Deciding who you are making the business plan for is a key step.

The final business plan that you create should contain your business’s key goals and how you plan on achieving those goals. Key areas of your business plan should include:

  1. Business Description
  2. Company Analysis
  3. Industry Analysis
  4. Marketing Plan
  5. Plan for Operations
  6. Financial Plan

Your business plan should come together as a quality, professional document. This plan will likely be referenced by outside parties and is key in helping you achieve your goals. The plan can and should evolve as you are working your way through developing your business.

Build a Team of Advisors

The next important step is building a team that can help advise you. Having a CPA and an attorney that are the right fit for you and your business can go a long way. Make sure your business culture meshes with their culture and values and that you can trust them. Both your attorney and CPA will be there to answers your questions, so knowing that they have your best interests in mind and that you are able to count on their advice is important.

An attorney can help draft up agreements, copyrights, patents, or other legal documents that might be needed, and a CPA can help you choose the proper business entity type that will best suit your needs as well as helping with accounting and bookkeeping throughout operations. As your business grows and becomes more complex, so does the accounting as well as potential legal issues. Make sure your CPA and attorney are have your goals in mind.

Next Steps and Financing

Once you have your plan and your team in place, there are now decisions and steps to take that both your attorney and CPA can help with.

  1. Select your business entity. Whether you form your business as a Sole proprietor, S-Corp, C-Corp, LLC or Partnership, each entity type has different tax and legal factors, so choosing the one that best suits your business is important.
  2. Register your business with your state.
  3. Request and obtain Federal and State identification numbers.
  4. Open a separate business bank account.
  5. Choose an accounting and recordkeeping software.
  6. Depending on your industry, consider purchasing general liability insurance.

A final step before being able to operate your business is obtaining proper financing for the operations.

Equity Financing

Equity financing means exchanging part of your ownership for cash. The positive of this option of financing is there are no interest payments that need to be made. This can be a very beneficial way to preserve cash when initially trying to get up and running. The downside is the loss of ownership which results in less earnings being distributed to yourself.

Debt Financing

A debt financing structure means borrowing money that will be repaid with interest. The positive of this way of financing is there is no lost equity in your business as well as the interest and principal payments are consistent and can be planned for. The downside is the interest that is to be paid as every bit of cash can be important when starting a business.

Owner Financing

Financing the business on your own is the most lucrative since there is no equity lost and no interest to be paid. However, many entrepreneurs will not be able to sustain the cash flow required to keep the business going, and will eventually require funding from debt or equity financing.

You have your plan, you have your team in place, and you have financed your business. You are now ready to begin operations and turn your dream idea into a reality. Throughout operations, continue to consult with your CPA and attorney as they can provide valuable advice every step of the way. Contact an Anders advisor to discuss your new business, or learn more about the Anders Startup Group.

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July 6, 2020

David Hartley Inducted as 2020-2023 MOCPA Board Member

David E. Hartley, CPA, CISA, Anders Partner and Director + Advisory, was sworn in as a Member of the Board of Directors for the Missouri Society of Certified Public Accountants (MOCPA) for a three year term effective July 1, 2020.

About David Hartley

Dave has been an active member of the MOCPA throughout his career. Most recently, he has held leadership positions in the organization as an Educational Foundation Board Member and a Transformation Committee Member since 2019.

As a partner and the Director of Advisory at Anders, Dave has over 25 years of experience in C-suite leadership roles and consulting with privately-held businesses on technology planning and enterprise risk services. He has experience defining the technology strategy and roadmaps for middle market businesses. At Anders, Dave oversees the strategy of the firm’s advisory services practice, identifying areas to enhance existing services and expand into other areas. A former Chief Information Officer (CIO) for a St. Louis-based public company, Dave participates in various CIO knowledge-sharing and collaboration forums and frequently offers his thought leadership at industry conferences and in publications.

About the MOCPA

Established in 1909, the Missouri Society of Certified Public Accountants (MOCPA) is the premier professional development organization dedicated to CPAs in Missouri, representing more than 8,000 members in public practice, industry, government, and education.

Membership in MOCPA provides a professional advantage by enabling CPAs to stay current on rapidly changing technical issues, improve the quality of their work, and advance their careers.  In turn, MOCPA members carry this advantage on to the individuals and businesses they serve.

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July 2, 2020

Did You Miss the Perfect Time to Sell Your Business?

Stockholders have been on a rollercoaster for much of 2020. The market was chugging along pretty nicely, continuing its steady and calm rise we saw from 2019…then COVID-19 hit. The Dow Jones at one point lost more than 38% in less than 40 days. Followed by market uncertainty and wild swings, the average investor was left reeling. Valuations of privately held business have also been turbulent. For the second quarter of 2020, we expect to see the average profit multiple decrease for the first time in many years.  

Have I missed the opportunity to sell my business at the peak?

The answer to this question is: maybe. But should you care? Probably not. The thing many of us forget is that when you sell your company, possibly your largest asset and the biggest wealth-creating event of your lifetime, you have to do something with the money you make.

These days, that means you’ll have to turn around and invest your windfall into an asset class that is arguably somewhat bubbly in historical terms. The current stock market is unsettled. The price of residential real estate has been continuously growing in many major centers, but what will the future hold? The near-term expectations for commercial real estate are murky, with many companies realizing their workforce may not need the typical office space anymore.

How will all of these aforementioned realities affect your decision to sell or hold on to your business? Perhaps a look at recent history can shed some light on this difficult decision.

How does market timing affect the sale?

Let’s look at a hypothetical example. Two imaginary business owners are each running a company generating a pretax profit of $500,000. Rebecca sold her business during a down year, say 2015, for 3x her pretax profit. She would have walked away with $1.5 million pretax to invest in the stock market.

Now let’s imagine business owner Scott, who decides to try and time the market. Scott waited out the downturn and sold his business at the end of 2017 for 4x pretax profit, walking away with $2 million before deal costs. At first glance, Scott looks like the winner because he sold at the peak and got 4x profit instead of Rebecca’s 3x. But when we take a closer look, Rebecca would be better off today. Assuming she had invested her $1.5 million in the stock market, she would now have roughly $2.125 million based on the Dow returns for 2017 and 2018 of 13.4% and 25.0%, respectively. 

What should I focus on instead of economic timing?

Timing the sale of your business on the basis of external markets is often a zero-sum game, because unless you’re going to hide the proceeds of a sale under your mattress, you’re probably buying into the same market conditions from which you’re selling out.

A better approach is to optimize your business against the eight things acquirers look for when they buy a business, regardless of what’s happening in the economy overall. Those eight key drivers of company value are:

  • Financial Performance
  • Growth Potential
  • Switzerland Structure
  • Valuation Teeter-Totter
  • Hierarchy of Recurring Revenue
  • Monopoly Control
  • Customer Satisfaction
  • Hub and Spoke

To many business owners, these drivers, without explanation, seem confusing at best. To better understand their meaning and to find out how you score on the eight factors that drive your company’s value, we are pleased to offer access to the Value Builder questionnaire. Learn more about Anders Business Transition Planning or contact an Anders advisor to find out how to add value to your business before selling.

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July 1, 2020

PPP Loan Application Deadline Extended to August 8

The President recently signed into law an extension of the application deadline for the Paycheck Protection Program from June 30 to August 8. As of June 30, approximately $130 billion of the $659 billion program was still unused.

Senator Ben Cardin proposed the extension and the bill passed the Senate by unanimous consent. The House passed the bill on July 1 and the President signed it into law on July 4. The legislation allows small businesses additional time to apply and the possibility for all the funds for the program to be used.

In late July, Congress is scheduled to discuss the next phase of Coronavirus relief with some of Congress hoping for changes to the program. Changes that could be coming include new modifications providing assistance to small businesses and disadvantaged areas. Additional talks are in the works of allowing for a second round of PPP loans for businesses with fewer than 100 employees that have lost a significant amount of revenue due to the pandemic. 

Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential business impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more insights or contact Anders below to discuss how we can help you along the PPP loan process.

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June 30, 2020

What Documents Do I Need to Apply for PPP Loan Forgiveness?

Now that Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan forgiveness applications are released; many businesses are wondering what exactly they need to compile to be able to apply. Below we dig into exactly what is needed from applicants, whether you apply using the EZ or standard forgiveness form.

Getting Started

Before you decide which application to use or start collecting documents, below is a list of standard information needed to begin the process.

  • Business Legal Name (“Borrower”) DBA or Tradename, if applicable
  • Type of Tax Return
  • Business Address
  • Business TIN (EIN, SSN)
  • Business Phone
  • Primary Contact E-mail Address
  • SBA PPP Loan Number
  • Lender PPP Loan Number
  • PPP Loan Amount
  • PPP Loan Disbursement Date
  • Employees at Time of Loan Application
  • Employees at Time of Forgiveness Application
  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Advance Amount
  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Application Number
  • Payroll Schedule
  • Covered Period
  • Alternative Payroll Covered Period, if applicable

Ready to start the process? Complete our PPP Forgiveness Information Request Form.

Documentation Needed Based on Application Type

Standard PPP Loan Forgiveness Application

If you’re using the standard PPP loan forgiveness form, here is what you will need to submit, according to the SBA:

Payroll:

Documentation verifying the eligible cash compensation and non-cash benefit payments from the Covered Period or the Alternative Payroll Covered Period consisting of each of the following:

  • Bank account statements or third-party payroll service provider reports documenting the amount of cash compensation paid to employees.
  • Tax forms (or equivalent third-party payroll service provider reports) for the periods that overlap with the Covered Period or the Alternative Payroll Covered Period:
    • Payroll tax filings reported, or that will be reported, to the IRS (typically, Form 941); and
    • State quarterly business and individual employee wage reporting and unemployment insurance tax filings reported, or that will be reported, to the relevant state
  • Payment receipts, cancelled checks, or account statements documenting the amount of any employer contributions to employee health insurance and retirement plans that the Borrower included in the forgiveness amount (PPP Schedule A, lines (6) and (7)).

FTE:

Documentation showing (at the election of the Borrower):

  • The average number of FTE employees on payroll per week employed by the Borrower between February 15, 2019 and June 30, 2019;
  • The average number of FTE employees on payroll per week employed by the Borrower between January 1, 2020 and February 29, 2020; or
  • In the case of a seasonal employer, the average number of FTE employees on payroll per week employed by the Borrower between February 15, 2019 and June 30, 2019; between January 1, 2020 and February 29, 2020; or any consecutive 12-week period between May 1, 2019 and September 15, 2019.

The selected time period must be the same time period selected for purposes of completing PPP Schedule A, line 11. Documents may include payroll tax filings reported, or that will be reported, to the IRS (typically, Form 941) and state quarterly business and individual employee wage reporting and unemployment insurance tax filings reported, or that will be reported, to the relevant state. Documents submitted may cover periods longer than the specific time period.

Nonpayroll:

Documentation verifying existence of the obligations/services prior to February 15, 2020 and eligible payments from the Covered Period.

  • Business mortgage interest payments: Copy of lender amortization schedule and receipts or cancelled checks verifying eligible payments from the Covered Period; or lender account statements from February 2020 and the months of the Covered Period through one month after the end of the Covered Period verifying interest amounts and eligible payments.
  • Business rent or lease payments: Copy of current lease agreement and receipts or cancelled checks verifying eligible payments from the Covered Period; or lessor account statements from February 2020 and from the Covered Period through one month after the end of the Covered Period verifying eligible payments.
  • Business utility payments: Copy of invoices from February 2020 and those paid during the Covered Period and receipts, cancelled checks, or account statements verifying those eligible payments.

Form 3508 EZ PPP Loan Forgiveness Application

If you’re using the EZ PPP loan forgiveness form, here is what you will need to submit, according to the SBA:

Payroll:

Documentation verifying the eligible cash compensation and non-cash benefit payments from the Covered Period or the Alternative Payroll Covered Period consisting of each of the following:

  • Bank account statements or third-party payroll service provider reports documenting the amount of cash compensation paid to employees.
  • Tax forms (or equivalent third-party payroll service provider reports) for the periods that overlap with the Covered Period or the Alternative Payroll Covered Period:
    • Payroll tax filings reported, or that will be reported, to the IRS (typically, Form 941); and
    • State quarterly business and individual employee wage reporting and unemployment insurance tax filings reported, or that will be reported, to the relevant state.
  • Payment receipts, cancelled checks, or account statements documenting the amount of any employer contributions to employee health insurance and retirement plans that the Borrower included in the forgiveness amount.
  • If you checked only the second box on the checklist on page 1 of these instructions, the average number of full-time equivalent employees on payroll employed by the Borrower on January 1, 2020 and at the end of the Covered Period.

Nonpayroll:

Documentation verifying existence of the obligations/services prior to February 15, 2020 and eligible payments from the Covered Period.

  • Business mortgage interest payments: Copy of lender amortization schedule and receipts or cancelled checks verifying eligible payments from the Covered Period; or lender account statements from February 2020 and the months of the Covered Period through one month after the end of the Covered Period verifying interest amounts and eligible payments.
  • Business rent or lease payments: Copy of current lease agreement and receipts or cancelled checks verifying eligible payments from the Covered Period; or lessor account statements from February 2020 and from the Covered Period through one month after the end of the Covered Period verifying eligible payments.
  • Business utility payments: Copy of invoices from February 2020 and those paid during the Covered Period and receipts, cancelled checks, or account statements verifying those eligible payments

Please note that these requirements came directly from the instructions for each application provided by the SBA. Download the EZ application instructions or view the EZ application. Download the standard forgiveness application instructions or view the standard forgiveness application.

Ready to start the process? Complete our PPP Forgiveness Information Request Form.

Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential business impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more insights or contact Anders below to discuss how we can help you along the PPP loan forgiveness process.

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June 30, 2020

MLS and MLS4TheLou Push Forward Amongst Pandemic

The outbreak of COVID-19 has been an unprecedented, worldwide event that has affected every aspect of our lives, including sports. Like everyone else, Major League Soccer was not immune from the outbreak. The league barely kicked off their 25th season before sports came screeching to a halt across the globe.

MLS is Back

It has been a little over three months since MLS suspended operations, but the league is ready to get back on the field in Florida. From July 8th to August 11th, the “MLS is Back” tournament will be played in Orlando with all 26 clubs participating. The tournament will feature a World Cup format with a group stage followed by knockout rounds. After the tournament is completed, the league is hopeful it will be able to play out the rest of the season and crown an MLS Cup champion before the end of the year.

Tax Benefits of Playing in Florida

From a tax perspective, players will be playing in a no income tax state during the tournament. This could provide players with large state income tax savings compared to their normal home states that they are accustomed to. For example, MLS star Carlos Vela, plays for LAFC and pays one of the highest state income tax rates in the country for the club’s home games in California. Although players had to take reduced salaries in the updated Collective Bargaining Agreement to get MLS back on to the field, playing in Florida offers some mitigation of financial loss by not paying any state income tax for the games played there.

Updates on MLS4TheLou

On the St. Louis home front, the MLS4TheLou ownership group continues to push forward to be ready for the club’s inaugural season in 2022. The ownership group continues to progress on their 22,500-seat state-of-the-art soccer specific stadium in Downtown West, as part of their vision for the first soccer district of its kind in the US. The district will also feature a training facility and team headquarters across Market Street. Since stadium construction is still in an early phase, construction has continued because social distancing practices can still be safely maintained.

The ownership group was expected to announce the team’s name, crest, and identity in the Spring, but the potential announcement has been pushed back indefinitely due to the ongoing pandemic. The branding unveil is still expected to occur before the end of 2020. The group has other priorities to take care of including appointing front office executives and building out the roster for kickoff in a few years.

The Anders Sports, Arts & Entertainment Group will continue to monitor the ongoing developments for both the return of MLS and the MLS4TheLou ownership group’s continuous expansion team progress.

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June 25, 2020

Is My Business Eligible to Claim the Employee Retention Tax Credit?

Qualified businesses can now take advantage of the employee retention tax credit as a COVID-19 relief option. For business operations that have been impacted by the pandemic, or simply experienced a significant decline in gross receipts compared to prior year, this credit is a great option. Below is a summary of the legislation updated June 15th, 2020.

Employee Retention Tax Credit Benefits

Qualified employers are allowed a credit against employment taxes equal to 50% of qualified wages (up to $10,000 in wages) for each employee.

Eligible Employers

  • All employers are eligible for the employee retention credit, including tax-exempt organizations.  However, if an employer receives a Small Business Interruption Loan under the Paycheck Protection Program authorized under the CARES Act, then the employer is not eligible for the Employee Retention Credit.
  • To qualify for the tax credit, eligible employers must be either:
    • An employer whose business is fully or partially suspended by a government order related to COVID-19; or
    • An employer with gross receipts that are less than 50% for the same quarter in the prior year.

Qualifying Wages

  • Qualifying wages are based on the average number of employees in 2019.
    • All wages paid qualify for the credit for employers with 100 or fewer employees.
    • Restrictions apply for employers with more than 100 employees.

Limitations

  • Qualified wages, including health care costs, are capped at $10,000 per employee regardless of the number of employees.
  • Qualifying wages cannot include wages that the employer received a credit for paid sick leave or paid family leaver under the Families First Coronavirus Reponses Act (FFCRA).
  • An employer must repay its PPP loan by the safe harbor deadline to be eligible.

Effective Date

Qualified employers can claim this refundable payroll tax credit for qualified wages paid to employees after March 12, 2020, and before Jan. 1, 2021.

This is a brief summary of the employee retention credit. Contact an Anders advisor for more details on how to claim the credit.  Our advisors are closely following COVID-19 relief efforts and will continue to publish insights to keep you informed about potential business impacts and benefits. Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for more news, tools and insights you need to know in these uncertain times.

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June 25, 2020

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loan Forgiveness Calculators and Tools

Tracking expenses is an important part of maximizing PPP loan forgiveness. Once you identify which expenses are eligible for PPP forgiveness, it’s time to start keeping track of these expenses and calculate your potential forgiveness amount. The Anders CARES Act Research and Response Team put together tracking tools you can use to make it easier when it comes time to start the loan forgiveness process.

Please note: these calculators provide an estimate based on our interpretation of the current guidelines, and actual loan forgiveness may differ when the SBA and banks release the loan forgiveness reporting forms.

Download the PPP Loan Forgiveness Calculator.

Download the 8-Week Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Calculator.

Download the 24-Week Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Calculator.

Download the Information Checklist to Apply for PPP Loan Forgiveness.

Updated 6/25/2020

Visit our COVID-19 Resource Center for other insights and tools surrounding the CARES Act.

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June 24, 2020

Anders Announces 2020 Promotions

2020 promotions were announced at the Anders virtual firm meeting on June 24th. Those promoted include Auditors Brad Soderstrom, Brian Loose and Kailey Johnson. Tax promotions include Ryan Huff, Jane Maddox, Nathan Stonner, Pam Ditch, Valerie Fohne, Erin Mueller, Adam Bauer, Chrysa Cousley, Claire Rogers, Darin Winkelman and Dalton Zieser. In Outsourced Accounting, Sam Burton and Skylar Trankle were promoted. Tyler Kaberline, Alex Grosse, Rob Kotsybar, Cory Gegg, Jon Ciembronowicz, Brett Hodges, Kris Nye and Michael Mitchell from Anders Technology received promotions. Ally Bruening in Marketing, Gretchen Best in Finance and support staff member Jen Bettag were also promoted. Click on the individual’s name below in blue to read more.

Jennifer O. Bettag has been promoted to Facilities Coordinator.


Samantha N. Burton, MBA has been promoted to Senior + Outsourced Accounting.


Skylar E. Trankle has been promoted to Senior + Outsourced Accounting.


Kailey M. Johnson, CPA has been promoted to Senior + Audit and Assurance.


Adam T. Bauer, CPA has been promoted to Senior + Tax.


Chrysa A. Cousley, CPA has been promoted to Senior + Tax.


Dalton R. Zeiser, CPA has been promoted to Senior + Tax.


Darin L. Winkelman has been promoted to Senior + Tax.


Brett M. Hodges has been promoted to Senior Systems Administrator + Technology.


Jon M. Ciembronowicz, MBA has been promoted to Senior Systems Administrator + Technology.


Kris R. Nye has been promoted to Senior Systems Administrator + Technology.


Michael C. Mitchell, CCNP has been promoted to Senior Systems Engineer + Technology.


Gretchen A. Best, CPA has been promoted to Accounting Supervisor + Finance.


Stephen S. Kohler, CPA has been promoted to Supervisor + Audit and Assurance.


Ally L. Bruening has been promoted to Marketing Manager.


Brian C. Loose, CPA has been promoted to Manager + Audit and Assurance.


Erin E. Mueller, CPA has been promoted to Manager + Tax.


Pam E. Ditch, CPA has been promoted to Manager + Tax.


Valerie S. Fohne has been promoted to Resource Manager + Tax.


Alex P. Grosse, VMTSP has been promoted to IT Manager of Infrastructure and Security + Technology


Tyler A. Kaberline, CHSP, VCP-DTM has been promoted to IT Manager of Applications and Customer Service + Technology.


Rob A. Kotsybar, MCTS, MCP, MCSA has been promoted to Service Manager + Technology.


Cory N. Gegg has been promoted to Service Desk Manager + Technology.


Bradley R. Soderstrom has been promoted to Senior Manager + Audit and Assurance.


Jane M. Maddox, CPA has been promoted to Senior Manager + Tax.


Nathan P. Stonner, CPA has been promoted to Senior Manager + Tax.


Ryan M. Huff, CPA has been promoted to Senior Manager + Tax.


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